Reub's journey

07 December 2015

Inheritance

 Son, never throw a punch at a redwood tree.
Tom Selleck


It's hard to explain how large a redwood is. Photographs can't really capture it.



Some of the big guys are 20 meters (65 feet) in circumference.




And over 90 meters (300 feet) tall, a football field on end.


 This tree was a baby when the Visigoths roamed Europe, and  already about a thousand years old when Marco Polo was exploring Asia.



 A redwood forest is very still most days. No wind.



 No sound.



 The forest floor.



 Base of a tree.


 Surface.



 Clear water.



 An inheritance from long ago, the redwoods.


31 comments:

  1. Replies
    1. They are.You should come up here and see them sometime, a change from Texas. :-)

      Delete
  2. I remember feeling I was in a very special place as I stood, surrounded by those gentle giants.

    ReplyDelete
  3. One of my most favorite places to go. Son and I camped for a week among the giants. We measured the trees with hugs - the largest took twelve before we met on the other side :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Awww! And you have pretty long arms too!

      Delete
  4. What a beautiful post. The redwoods are amazing. I love to visit them - they are immense but quiet. Your photos do them justice.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I took a zillion pics, but it's hard to capture the redwoods. Not sure I did.

      Delete
  5. Walking through a redwood forest is a very special experience. Stanley Park in Vancouver has a redwood forest that I walked through in the summer. It was an awe inspiring walk. I could imagine landing in a ship and finding such a place. Your photos are beautiful, Kerry. Thank you for sharing.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, imagine landing in North America and coming upon these trees. And all of the other great wonders of the West. Sacred places.

      Delete
  6. I am sure the "base of the tree" photo shows an Ent in repose.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Haha! You are so right! There's a face in that base.

      Delete
  7. Great photos! I was visiting the redwoods in mid-Sept on my way back from Lassen National Park. I didn't get to spend much time, so a return trip is in the future.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. SO much to see in northern CA. The redwood parks are divvied up into state and national reserves; we managed to stop at 6 different groves and could easily go back for more. Would love to go to Lassen, but first should probably hike Oregon's Obsidian Trail.

      Delete
  8. That last photo is really special although all of them are truly lovely. Maybe some day we will figure out how to talk to trees!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Tabor. These trees have been around soooo long; I wonder what they would say.

      Delete
  9. What lovely pictures to share. I love being in a forest like this, it is almost like a fairy tale.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, magical. The old growth forests in Oregon are also awe-inspiring, but the ancient redwoods have a draw of their very own.

      Delete
  10. Thank you, thank you for this wonderful post. I did not know these things and now I want to see a redwood up close and personal.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Granny, come west! You would love it. However you will feel teeny tiny next to a redwood. :)

      Delete
  11. I've never been to the redwoods or experienced their grandeur. will have to one day.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ah yes. They are just a day's drive from west central Oregon. You've been kinda close.

      Delete
  12. I'm with you. Sometimes nature presents you with a spectacle so vast that trying to capture it on such a small device like a camera feels like a crime. Your photos are magnificent, though. Thanks.

    Greetings from London.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello Cubano. For sure the redwoods are best understood by seeing them in person. They were fun to photograph, but I couldn't capture them.

      Delete
  13. We have a very small redwood copse nearby. I have no idea how the trees got here or who planted them, but they are a few hundred years old to judge by their size. They are quite wonderful.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Really? Wow. I suppose that your climate would be quite good for them. They're probably thriving.

      Delete
  14. I have always wanted to see Redwoods. Your photos are just so beautiful.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hilary, maybe you should visit the west coast. I can only imagine what fantastic photos you could take.

      Delete
  15. We saw them on One visit to California. They are impressive.

    ReplyDelete
  16. Your photos of the forest are beautiful! I spent many summers camping in the Redwoods when I was a kid and I still love them. Thanks for these. I found your blog via The Smitten Image. What a discovery!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello Kaye! Thanks for visiting, and for the nice comment. I love The Smitten Image.

      Delete

Talk to me.